Deep Throat

I think the ballot box has somewhat less security than this.  (Photo credit: Tanakawho)

Deep Throat comes in various forms.  (Photo credit: Tanakawho)

Major events have a way of incorporating references from unusual places and, in return, the linguistic remnants of these historical moments find their way to even stranger contexts.

For example, think of Deep Throat.  Perhaps most commonly known as the pseudonym for the man whose revelations would lead to Richard Nixon’s downfall, the name “Deep Throat” originated as the title of a pornographic movie.  Of course, its politically tinged use has kept that phrase recognizable in English vocabulary even when the two words are used together unintentionally.

This week, you’re going to allow a phrase to travel from obscurity to fame, or vice versa.  (Fame is a relative term.)  Choose one of the following options:

1- Choose an obscure name and apply it to something more prominent in today’s political culture.  That “something” should be significant enough to end up in a history book one day.  There should be no obvious connection between the origin and the new context you choose.

2- Choose a phrase that is already prominent in today’s political culture and apply it to something unexpected and less historically significant.

Compose and publish your response to this prompt on your own blog.  Be sure to include a link to this post so that a pingback will appear here, thereby allowing other participants to discover your work.  Please be patient if your pingback does not appear immediately; I am not at my computer 24/7 and I have to approve all pingbacks.  For this reason, using the bcandelabra tag may be advisable.

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17 comments

  1. I can’t do it on my blog, I am doing my self-obsessed art work marathon… but I would like to use my original phrase; ‘put a lizard on it’ in conjunction with that tea-party asshole Ted Cruz announcing his candidacy…

      1. A term indeed with high potential for this challenge. Although some historic tome claimed it to be the marshy valley of foxes. I’m trying to decide if the two meanings have a connection I cannot yet perceive?

        Thanks for this challenge, I did learn a new word even if it was last spoken in 1686 (or thereabouts).

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